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Science-Fiction Adventure in the Far Future
Bwap Society

Bwap Society

Society is dominated by the Bwap world-view, which holds that each individual has a place in the wapawab or tree - a view stemming from their habitat, but including phratry, bloodlines, country, and place of duty. The literal tree is intricately tied into the planetary ecology, providing shelter and oxygen, converting water and minerals into food, etc.

The figurative tree is much harder to define, but is roughly equivalent to a clan or tribal group. Both sorts of trees are part of a planet, which is part of a solar system, which is part of a cluster, which is part of a galaxy, which is part of the cosmos.

Everything the Bwaps do reflects this complex, wheels- within-wheels outlook. Each individual takes great pride in being one small, functional and unique cog in a vast, ever-changing universe of interlinked patterns. Their ritual of greeting, for instance, seems like meaningless formality and windy chit-chat to non-Bwaps, but communicates "I am in this place, and doing my part. Where are you and what are you doing?"

From the human point of view, Bwaps are obsessed with minutae, patterns, and the order of things. Driven by this internal desire to see everything in its proper place, they make excellent bureaucrats, officials, mathematicians, bookkeepers, scientists, and historians.

However, their obsession with ritual and proper conduct can make them difficult to deal with. Those who violate the rituals will be lectured to, at length, on propriety. Dealing with Bwaps takes time, but trying to speed things up only takes more time.

Criminal behaviour is extremely rare, and is considered the worst form of mental disorder among Bwaps, since it disrupts the proper order of things. Their world-view means that their definition of crime is often at variance with Imperial norms, but fortunately most Bwaps courts consider exile to be sufficient punishment, especially in the case of aliens such as humans.

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